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HCPS publishes minutes of School Board meetings after Board approval. Although the online minutes do not include signatures, citizens may arrange to review the official documents by completing a public records request with the Communications Department.

MINUTES
SCHOOL BOARD OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA
901 E. Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

The School Board of Hillsborough County, Florida, met in Workshop Session Tuesday, February 14, 2017, at 9 a.m., in the School Board Auditorium, 901 East Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, with Superintendent Jeff Eakins, and Board Members Lynn L. Gray, Sally Harris, Tamara P. Shamburger, Cindy Stuart, and Susan Valdes present.  Chair Cindy Stuart presided.

Members absent:  Melissa Snively and April Griffin 

Board Attorney – James Porter

Chief of Staff:  Alberto Vazquez, Ed.D.

Deputy Superintendent:  Van Ayres

Chief of Schools, Administration:  Harrison Peters

Assistant Superintendents/Division Chiefs:

      Academic Support and Federal Programs –Tracye Brown

      Business – Gretchen Saunders

      Diversity – Minerva Spanner-Morrow

      Educational Leadership and Professional Development – Tricia McManus

      Human Resources – Stephanie Woodford

      Operations – Chris Farkas

      Outreach – Larry Sykes, Ed.D

      Student Services – Wynne Tye

      Teaching and Learning – Elizabeth Agresta

      Workforce Connections – Scott Brooks

External Communications Manager – Tanya Arja

Administrative Secretary (Recording) – Kandee King

News Media Representatives:

      Tampa Bay Times – Marlene Sokol

Approximately 20 people were in the audience, including other school district personnel.

Chair Stuart called the meeting to order at 9 a.m.

Hillsborough County Public Schools Staffing Overview (Instructional Unit Allocation)

This workshop was held to provide School Board Members with an overview of the Instruction Unit Allocation.

Superintendent Eakins welcomed everyone and made brief remarks.

Deputy Superintendent Van Ayres explained how units are allocated and discussed the three goals:  Base unit allocation, formula based units, and supplemental units.

Dr. Libby Tuten, Manager of Planning and Related Services, provided a PowerPoint presentation discussing the Instructional Unit Allocation process.  Our goal is to have equitable allocation, appropriate funding, and a sustainable process.

Basic Unit allocation impacts instruction and generates FTE (Full Time Equivelant) for district sites.  The unit allocation formula is tied to both enrollment and average class size across schools and student population.  We need to optimize the service provider to allow for meaningful work and financial solvency.

During a Stakeholder Group meeting, held earlier this year, the group reached consensus on the ideas or concepts that should be used to measure a school's need.  This feedback was recorded so that data measuring each of these factors could be identified and reviewed by a smaller subgroup of district staff who would determine the best way to measure "need" with existing data.

The subgroup reviewed existing student demographic data, school performance data, achievement data, teacher data, and administrative data to determine which measures captured the most variance from school to school.  To be sure that it was statistically appropriate to scale these measures as one variable, the HELP (Hiring, Enhancing, Learning, and Preparing) score, and additional statistical tests were run (i.e. correlation, skewness, and variance). 

There were 16 variables identified that reflected the Stakeholder Group's consensus about school need.  For consistency and statistical purposes, these were all measured in the direction of increasing need.  The measures are:

Student Attributes

  • Readiness (Percentage of students not ready for kindergarten, middle school, high school as measured by Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener, 5th grade Florida Standards Assessment, English Language Arts and Math, 8th grade Florida Standards Assessment English Language Arts and Math proficiency)
  • Attendance (Percentage of students with less than 90% attendance)
  • Behavior (Percentage of students with one or more suspensions)
  • Instability (Percentage of students present less than 180 days of those ever enrolled)

Student Achievement

  • English Language Arts (Percentage of students not proficient on Florida Standards Assessment English Language Arts)
  • Math (Percentage of students not proficient on Florida Standards Assessment Math or End of Course
  • English Language Arts Gains (Percentage of students not making gains on Florida Standards Assessment English Language Arts)
  • Math Gains (Percentage of students not making gains on Florida Standards Assessment Math or End of Course)
  • English Language Arts Bottom Quartile Gains (Percentage of bottom quartile students not making gains on Florida Standards Assessment English Language Arts)
  • Math Bottom Quartile Gains (Percentage of bottom quartile students not making gains on Florida Standards Assessment Math or End of Course)
  • Performance
    • Elementary (Percentage of 1st and 2nd grade students scoring below the 40th percentile on Scholastic Aptitude Test-10 Math Applications and Scholastic Aptitude Test-10 Reading Comprehension)
    • Middle (Percentage of students with one or more course failure in a core Math or English Language Arts course)
    • High (Percentage of standard diploma students not graduating on time)

School Leadership

  • Administrator Capacity (100 minus the total years of service for all administrators at the school combined)

Professional Capacity

  • New Teachers (Percentage of teachers with less than three years teaching experience)
  • Teacher Attendance (Percentage of teachers missing 10% or more of instructional days)
  • Teacher Performance (Percentage of teachers rated Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory)
  • Teacher Movement (Percentage of teachers not retained at school from prior year)

HELP (Hiring, Enhancing, Learning, and Preparing) scores were calculated, the subgroup also considered how best to tier the HELP scores to determine supplemental unit allocations.  Both equipercentile (e.g., quartiles, quintiles, etc.) and deviation based methods were reviewed and estimated.

HELP scores for each building type are divided into four tiers:  Tier 1 includes all schools with HELP scores that are more than one standard deviation below the mean.  Tier 2 includes all schools with HELP scores that are within one standard deviation below the mean.  Tier 3 includes all schools with HELP scores that are within one standard deviation above the mean.  Tier 4 includes all schools with HELP scores more than one standard deviation above the mean.  This method of determining tiers allows for most schools to fall within tiers 2 and 3, and for the HELP score to differentiate low and high need schools among building types.

  • The initial HELP score allocates a certain number of supplemental units to each school based on the type of school and degree of need measured on the 16 factors. 
  • After the HELP score is calculated, two additional enhancements are possible to determine the school’s final supplemental unit allocation.  First, the school’s level of poverty (as determined by percent of students receiving free or reduced price lunch) may enhance the supplemental unit allocation for the school.  Tiers for poverty were borrowed from an existing method which allows for four tiers as well.   
  • The final enhancement was determined using the school’s status in Florida’s Differentiated Accountability system.  Those enhancements are tiered as well.  Schools received enhancements based on their status in Planning Turnaround, Implementing Turnaround Option Plan (TOP) 1, or Implementing Turnaround Option Plan 2.  Several "Elevate” schools do not fall in one of the state Differentiated Accountability categories, but were added in Tier 1 to assist with school improvement efforts.
  • Planning and Related Services has an Icon in FirstClass where all information will be shared.  Each school site’s supplemental form is posted for all to view. 

There was general discussion to include:

  • Physical Education, Music, and Art units are adjusted in the fall.
  • Non-instructional units are allocated based on a different formula not presented today.
  • Information provided had great detail and understanding on how our schools are graphed.
  • Area Superintendents are now provided the opportunity to work with their schools on units.
  • It is important to have a high quality and effective teacher in these units. 
  • School Board Members need to have the most current information on these processes in order to keep our constituents well informed.
  • Teacher Talent Development Program (TTD) currently has 59 units that will move forward.  Principals like that TTD teachers are in the classroom part of the day.  The TTD program is one we must sustain before we can grow.
  • Timeline is important for teachers in this program.  Know changes in their duties before transfer period.  Human Resources and Classroom Teachers Association have met and talked through different scenarios to ensure teachers have accurate information.
  • Job descriptions for the Teacher Talent Development Program have been prepared.
  • A copy of stakeholder meeting dates and group members will be sent to all Board Members.

With no further business the meeting was adjourned at 10:33 a.m.  (Audio recording on file.)

HCPS publishes minutes of School Board meetings after Board approval. Although the online minutes do not include signatures, citizens may arrange to review the official documents by completing a public records request with the Communications Department.

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